An interview with Roger and Louise Nilles.

An interview with Roger and Louise Nilles.

 ProLifeCorner.com  –  Freeport Il.-   Louise and Roger Nilles live in a modest R n L 275xhome in the shadow of a high rise apartment.  Roger and Louise are a loving couple who have worked tirelessly, over the years, to help others in the community.  There selfless love for family and community is well known.  Because of devastating health problems, they are now the ones in need of a helping hand.  Louise has worked for a local health care facility for over 20 years, but recently her hours have been cut.

Since our previous article about Louise and Roger Nilles there have been several steps forward and a few steps back.

The good news is that the much needed downstairs bathroom is almost completed, work has begun on a wheelchair ramp, and to everyone’s delight, Roger has an artificial limb.  He’s on his way to his goal-to dance with Louise again. Continue reading

The Light of Glory

The Light of Glory

 “While Jesus was praying, his face changed in appearance and his clothing became dazzling white.”

A woman who had never seen the ocean before went on a cruise.  On the voyage she was captivated by the variety of colors she saw in different parts of the ocean — azure, turquoise, aquamarine, emerald.   She collected samples of each hue in small bottles.

When she returned home, she wanted to show her friends the magnificent colors she had seen.   But when she poured the contents of each bottle into separate glasses to show them, she was shocked to see that all they contained was water — colorless, translucent, ordinary water. Continue reading

Euthanasia: A Personal Perspective

Beaumont, Alberta, Canada-   by Mark Pickup-  The onset of multiple sclerosis is sudden. I went dead from the waist down. I could not distinguish something hot from something cold. I could not distinguish blunt from sharp. Overnight, I lost the use of my right hand, and I am right handed. My wife had to help me dress. For a time, I could not hold a pencil, and when I came to the point where I could, I scribbled like a little kid. Within a week, I had gone from the world of the able-bodied to the world of the disabled. They are distinctly different worlds, rather like two solitudes.

From 1984 to 1987, I found myself on a relentless slide downhill. The pattern of attack and remission was so volatile that I would go to bed at night not knowing what I would wake up with or wake up without. My vision was affected for a while. I would lose the ability to speak, and I would froth like an imbecile. I would gain my speech back, lose it, gain it, lose it. I would go incontinent. I would lose sensation. I would lose short term memory and experience confusion. In fact, that is what drove me from my career in the end, I would go spastic. I would experience a crippling fatigue, and I still do. Continue reading