Losing Your Life for Christ’s Sake

Losing Your Life for Christ’s Sake

“Anyone who loses his life for my sake… will save it.”

Pierre Claverie (Clav’er aye) was born in Algeria in 1938. He grew up in a loving family of French people who had settled in Algeria. He said he lived in a “colonial bubble,” in other words, completely cut off from the majority Arab population. As a young man he was called to the priesthood and joined the Dominicans in France. Despite the political upheavals, he wanted to return and serve in Algeria. He steeped himself in the Arab culture, learning the language and living close to the people. He wanted to bear witness to Christ’s call to reconciliation between races.

In 1981, Pierre Claverie (Clav’er ee) was made Bishop of Oran. Christians in the region were few in number and surrounded by a dominant Muslim population. As Muslim fundamentalists became more powerful, Christians were threatened and several members of religious orders were assassinated. (Clav’er ee)  became increasingly aware of the danger he was in, but in this situation he also deepened his understanding of the cross. He did not leave but stayed to bear witness to the love and mercy of Jesus and his promise of eternal life. In 1996 Bishop Pierre Claverie (Clav’er ee) and his Muslim driver were blown up by a terrorist bomb. Continue reading

Judging Others vs Showing Compassion

Judging Others vs Showing Compassion

“… her many sins have been forgiven because she has shown great love. But the one to whom little is forgiven, loves little.”

For almost two years Peter and Susan traveled together through the terrifying wilderness of serious illness.

Susan had just returned home from playing tennis when she suddenly dropped to the kitchen floor. She was rushed to the emergency room of the local hospital, where she was stabi­lized. As her husband Peter and their children Jacob and Rachel watched helplessly, Susan was put on life support before being airlifted to a university hospital. Susan had suffered a brain aneurysm.

It was the beginning of an 18-month odyssey for Susan and Peter and their family that including three brain surgeries, dev­astating setbacks, frustrating rehab, erratic mood swings — and waiting – and struggling to pray. Continue reading

Showing Compassion to Those Who Are Grieving

Showing Compassion to Those Who Are Grieving

“As [Jesus] drew near the gate of [Nain], a man who had died was being carried out, the only son of his mother, and she was a widow.”

From an article entitled “A Grieving Mom’s Request “ which appeared in The Boston Globe Magazine, on March 8, 2015. – a year after the death of her daughter, a grieving mom – Roberta Waters writes to family and friends: she writes,

“There are no appropriate words; nothing you can say that will make it better. But your calls, your visits, your invitations mean a lot to me. They remind me that I am still alive and still have a life outside of this tragedy.” Continue reading

Pentecost and Homily 2016

Pentecost and Homily 2016

Introduction:

Good afternoon (morning)!  Today the Church celebrates the Solemnity of Pentecost – the coming of the Holy Spirit and the 1983rd birthday of the Church, which began in the year 33 AD! 

The Church recognizes two forms of revelation – Sacred Scripture –the Written Tradition as revealed by the God the Father and God the Son, AND Sacred Tradition (aka Oral Tradition) as clarified and explained more fully by God the Holy Spirit! 

Pentecost is the beginning of Sacred Tradition! The work of the Holy Spirit in the Church, as first revealed to the apostles – the first pope and first bishops, and continues to the end of time with their successors, the pope and bishops in union with him!

It is only to the pope and the bishops in union with him, and only them, does the guarantee of unbroken line of Truth and authoritative interpretation of divine revelation reside!  Continue reading

Ascension/Mother’s Day Homily

ProLifeCorner-  We recently received this Mother’s Day homily from a good friend. He speaks of the awesomeness of mothers and their role in the family, and yet does so in a lighthearted way. And then he brings us back to the celebration of Jesus’ Ascension into heaven. Enjoy, and may our Lord richly bless all of the Mothers who give their selfless love to all their children.

Ascension/Mother’s Day Homily

Good morning!  Today the Church celebrates the Solemnity of the Ascension of Our Lord in Heaven!  On the Solemnity of the Ascension, the Church does not merely commemorate an historical event in the life of Christ. Rather, on this day, the Church celebrates Christ’s physical departure from time and space, to His glorification with God the Father in eternity.

Each and every Holy Sacrifice of the Mass offered daily around the world is a celebration and re-enactment of Christ’s glorification.  By glorification, I mean His life and ministry, His suffering, His death, His resurrection, AND His Ascension into heaven!

Moreover, the Ascension of Jesus into heaven is a definitive sign and symbol of His glorious Second Coming and the end of time on the last day. The Ascension is Jesus’ legacy.  But, Jesus Christ will return to the earth in the same manner as He left it. When the risen Lord returns again in glory, God’s will for mankind will be fulfilled.

The Ascension is also an impending sign of the coming of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost, which the Church will celebrate next week! Continue reading

Samaritan Woman at the Well: A Different Perspective

Samaritan Woman at the Well: A Different Perspective

ProLifeCorner-

The woman said to Him, ‘Sir, I can see that you are a prophet? Our ancestors worshipped on this mountain; but you people say that the place to worship is in Jerusalem.”

In 1923, the Jewish theologian Martin Buber wrote an immensely influential little book entitled I and Thou. Buber’s main point is that there are two ways of relating to other people in our lives: We can see them as objects to be used – what Buber calls an “I-it” relationship; or we can see others as having feelings, dreams and needs as real and as important as our own that can be the basis for dialogue and relationship – an “I-Thou” relationship.

In his memoirs, Buber tells the story of how he came to his theory of I-Thou and I-It. When he was a professor of philosophy at a university in Germany, a young student came to see him. The student had received his draft notice to serve in the German army in World War I. He was a pacifist by nature and afraid of being killed in battle, but, at the same time, he was a loyal and fiercely patriotic German. He asked Buber what he should do: serve his country and risk being killed or claim conscientious objector status and perhaps leave another young man to be killed in his place. Continue reading

The Light of Glory

The Light of Glory

 “While Jesus was praying, his face changed in appearance and his clothing became dazzling white.”

A woman who had never seen the ocean before went on a cruise.  On the voyage she was captivated by the variety of colors she saw in different parts of the ocean — azure, turquoise, aquamarine, emerald.   She collected samples of each hue in small bottles.

When she returned home, she wanted to show her friends the magnificent colors she had seen.   But when she poured the contents of each bottle into separate glasses to show them, she was shocked to see that all they contained was water — colorless, translucent, ordinary water. Continue reading

Ash Wednesday Introduction2016

Ash Wednesday Introduction 2016

ProLifeCorner- Today all throughout the world, Christians of many denominations will start a 40 day period of fasting and prayer. A dear friend of the ProLifeCorner sent us his introduction to this most holy season. To some Christians who do not practice Lent, hopefully this introduction will provide a little deeper understanding of this holy season. If practicing Lent is not part of your tradition, and this introduction makes sense to you, please join us on this holy journey for a more personal relationship with our Lord and Savior.

Ash Wednesday Introduction

Today, the Church celebrates Ash Wednesday, the beginning of Lent.

Lent has three major themes: repentance, purification, and growth.  These three themes are exemplified very appropriately by the use of ashes. Continue reading

Do You Have A Personal Relationship With Jesus?

Do You Have A Personal Relationship With Jesus?

ProLifeCorner.com –  Frank J. Munda- 2-7-2016 – Often people will ask this most important question: Do you have a personal relationship with Jesus? It’s a good question   Do you have the right answer? Is the answer yes?  By the very nature of someone accepting Jesus into their life we all have varying degrees of relationship with our Lord.

If you profess to be Christian the question is, what does it mean to have a personal relationship with Jesus? I came from a background that might seem strange to some; that is we were Catholic on my Father’s side of the family and Protestant on my Mother’s side.  My Mom and Dad had four sons and I was the third born.  My mother had a lovely singing voice and loved the old Protestant hymns. When we were small, often at night my Mom would sing the beautiful old Protestant hymns to us.  “The Old Rugged Cross” was one of my favorites. Of course when I was real small I did not understand this Protestant – Catholic thing. As I grew up unfortunately the differences became more clear to me.  My favorite aunt was a Baptist Christian.  She was a good and kind person and I know she loved me as her nephew, but I had difficulty understanding how she could hate my Catholic faith. When my young wife and I had an opportunity to purchase our first home, it was my aunt who gave us the down payment. In her own way she had a relationship with Jesus; she was a good, kind and loving person to those around her. The only thing that I truly could not understand is how she could love Jesus, and yet take such a strong anti-Catholic position. Continue reading

Why Should I Go to Mass?

Why Should I Go to Mass?”

ProLifeCorner-

“He… “He went into the synagogue on the Sabbath day as was His custom.”

A story from ancient Egypt tells how the god Thoth invented a new way of helping people learn and remember things, a system called writing. Thoth explained his invention to the king of Egypt; but the king was not impressed. He said the invention was liable to make people lazy in trying to remember things; that they would start to rely on written things instead of thinking for themselves. Worst of all, it would allow people to appear learned, rather than actually being learned. Written things need the help of the author to explain them, the human touch.

Although this is just an ancient myth, it still has some valid points to make. First, we learn from other people. Books are written by other people; they don’t appear out of the blue or fall out of the sky. And second, we learn better from human contact in teaching, even when books are involved – what the ancient Greek philosopher Plato called “the animated speech of a knowledgeable person.” Even then, although the person might have knowledge, they also need the gift of passing on that knowledge, of helping others become keen to learn, and setting people on fire with a love of that subject. And with the invention of the printing press in the fifteenth century, some of the Egyptian king’s misgivings came true. People sometimes mistook the book for learning or wisdom itself. Sometimes they thought that simply by reading or quoting that they would become learned, and so they neglected the need for understanding, for teaching and for interpretation to bring the written word to life. Continue reading