Courage or Compromise

Courage or Compromise

“Do you suppose that I am here to bring peace on earth?”

During the 1930’s Winston Churchill experienced what are called his “wilderness years.”   He was out of government, out of office and out of style. His day was over and done with, his influence on British public life seemingly in decline. Churchill retired to his country home in Kent, south of London, tended his garden, built brick walls and brooded.

In particular, he brooded about Hitler and the rise of Fascism and Nazism in Europe. Alarmed at what he heard about the rearmament of Germany, Churchill began to make speeches in the House of Commons, calling on the government of the day to be vigilant and to rearm the country against the threat of Nazi might. In reply, Members of Parliament denounced Churchill as a warmonger. After the horror of the First World War, nobody wanted to contemplate the possibility of another conflict. Peace was the order of the day, and any talk of arms and fighting would only serve to depress people and to dishearten them. It was madness to talk of war, and only a madman would contemplate such a thing. Churchill was ignored. But Churchill was right. The sad truth came all too quickly, to blight another generation and to send millions to the grave. Continue reading

One Person Can Make A Difference

One Person Can Make A Difference

7-12-2016 – ProLifeCorner – A good friend of the Pro Life Corner sent us this article.  It clearly shows how only one person can make a huge difference in the lives of so many.  Over 100 babies have been born thanks to the courage, devotion, and faith of this one man.  We should all learn from his example and go out to help save the lives of the many unborn who are being subjected to a heinous death due to abortion. Continue reading

The Sick and Dying

The Sick and Dying

“They stripped and beat him, and went off leaving him half dead.”

Today’s gospel speaks to us of Jesus’ great concern and love for the sick and dying. Throughout His public ministry, Jesus’ compassion and love for the sick shines through. In several instances, we read how Jesus cured the sick and restored them to friendship with His Father. The Church continues Jesus’ ministry of caring for the sick and dying with deep compassion and respect for human dignity.

The Church especially continues Christ’s ministry to the sick and dying through the Sacraments. In offering the Sacrament of Penance, the Anointing of the Sick and Viaticum, which is Holy Communion of the Sick and Dying, the priest brings to those who are ill the loving and redeeming embrace of Jesus. In these moments rich with grace, the priest acting in the Person of Christ brings to the patient, forgiveness, inner healing and strength for what lies ahead. Together with deacons, religious, lay ministers, and volunteers, the priest shares with the patient, and with the patient’s family, the Good News of Jesus, the Gospel of life and salvation. Through the grace of God, patients are enabled to unite their sufferings with the Lord’s so as to share His everlasting joy and glory. So also the Church reaches out to families facing the serious illnesses of loved ones with deep respect for the precious gift of life and with the hope for the gift of eternal life. Continue reading

The Harvest Is Rich, But The Laborers Are Few.

The harvest is rich, but the laborers are few.

The world famous golfer Tiger Woods was once given a piece of advice by his father: “My dad once told me: no matter what anyone says or writes, really, none of those people has to hit your four-foot putt. You have to do it yourself.”

Perhaps what Mr. Woods senior meant is that there are some things we can only do ourselves regardless of other people. In a slightly different vein is the old saying, “If you want something done right, you have to do it yourself.” It can be said by exasperated parents who have sent their child to the shop to buy something and the child comes back with something quite different: or perhaps by boss whose staff doesn’t come up to snuff. Self-reliance and a willingness to do things for ourselves may be admirable traits. Indeed, there are some things that we just have to do for ourselves. Continue reading

Losing Your Life for Christ’s Sake

Losing Your Life for Christ’s Sake

“Anyone who loses his life for my sake… will save it.”

Pierre Claverie (Clav’er aye) was born in Algeria in 1938. He grew up in a loving family of French people who had settled in Algeria. He said he lived in a “colonial bubble,” in other words, completely cut off from the majority Arab population. As a young man he was called to the priesthood and joined the Dominicans in France. Despite the political upheavals, he wanted to return and serve in Algeria. He steeped himself in the Arab culture, learning the language and living close to the people. He wanted to bear witness to Christ’s call to reconciliation between races.

In 1981, Pierre Claverie (Clav’er ee) was made Bishop of Oran. Christians in the region were few in number and surrounded by a dominant Muslim population. As Muslim fundamentalists became more powerful, Christians were threatened and several members of religious orders were assassinated. (Clav’er ee)  became increasingly aware of the danger he was in, but in this situation he also deepened his understanding of the cross. He did not leave but stayed to bear witness to the love and mercy of Jesus and his promise of eternal life. In 1996 Bishop Pierre Claverie (Clav’er ee) and his Muslim driver were blown up by a terrorist bomb. Continue reading

Judging Others vs Showing Compassion

Judging Others vs Showing Compassion

“… her many sins have been forgiven because she has shown great love. But the one to whom little is forgiven, loves little.”

For almost two years Peter and Susan traveled together through the terrifying wilderness of serious illness.

Susan had just returned home from playing tennis when she suddenly dropped to the kitchen floor. She was rushed to the emergency room of the local hospital, where she was stabi­lized. As her husband Peter and their children Jacob and Rachel watched helplessly, Susan was put on life support before being airlifted to a university hospital. Susan had suffered a brain aneurysm.

It was the beginning of an 18-month odyssey for Susan and Peter and their family that including three brain surgeries, dev­astating setbacks, frustrating rehab, erratic mood swings — and waiting – and struggling to pray. Continue reading

Showing Compassion to Those Who Are Grieving

Showing Compassion to Those Who Are Grieving

“As [Jesus] drew near the gate of [Nain], a man who had died was being carried out, the only son of his mother, and she was a widow.”

From an article entitled “A Grieving Mom’s Request “ which appeared in The Boston Globe Magazine, on March 8, 2015. – a year after the death of her daughter, a grieving mom – Roberta Waters writes to family and friends: she writes,

“There are no appropriate words; nothing you can say that will make it better. But your calls, your visits, your invitations mean a lot to me. They remind me that I am still alive and still have a life outside of this tragedy.” Continue reading

Pentecost and Homily 2016

Pentecost and Homily 2016

Introduction:

Good afternoon (morning)!  Today the Church celebrates the Solemnity of Pentecost – the coming of the Holy Spirit and the 1983rd birthday of the Church, which began in the year 33 AD! 

The Church recognizes two forms of revelation – Sacred Scripture –the Written Tradition as revealed by the God the Father and God the Son, AND Sacred Tradition (aka Oral Tradition) as clarified and explained more fully by God the Holy Spirit! 

Pentecost is the beginning of Sacred Tradition! The work of the Holy Spirit in the Church, as first revealed to the apostles – the first pope and first bishops, and continues to the end of time with their successors, the pope and bishops in union with him!

It is only to the pope and the bishops in union with him, and only them, does the guarantee of unbroken line of Truth and authoritative interpretation of divine revelation reside!  Continue reading

Ascension/Mother’s Day Homily

ProLifeCorner-  We recently received this Mother’s Day homily from a good friend. He speaks of the awesomeness of mothers and their role in the family, and yet does so in a lighthearted way. And then he brings us back to the celebration of Jesus’ Ascension into heaven. Enjoy, and may our Lord richly bless all of the Mothers who give their selfless love to all their children.

Ascension/Mother’s Day Homily

Good morning!  Today the Church celebrates the Solemnity of the Ascension of Our Lord in Heaven!  On the Solemnity of the Ascension, the Church does not merely commemorate an historical event in the life of Christ. Rather, on this day, the Church celebrates Christ’s physical departure from time and space, to His glorification with God the Father in eternity.

Each and every Holy Sacrifice of the Mass offered daily around the world is a celebration and re-enactment of Christ’s glorification.  By glorification, I mean His life and ministry, His suffering, His death, His resurrection, AND His Ascension into heaven!

Moreover, the Ascension of Jesus into heaven is a definitive sign and symbol of His glorious Second Coming and the end of time on the last day. The Ascension is Jesus’ legacy.  But, Jesus Christ will return to the earth in the same manner as He left it. When the risen Lord returns again in glory, God’s will for mankind will be fulfilled.

The Ascension is also an impending sign of the coming of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost, which the Church will celebrate next week! Continue reading

Samaritan Woman at the Well: A Different Perspective

Samaritan Woman at the Well: A Different Perspective

ProLifeCorner-

The woman said to Him, ‘Sir, I can see that you are a prophet? Our ancestors worshipped on this mountain; but you people say that the place to worship is in Jerusalem.”

In 1923, the Jewish theologian Martin Buber wrote an immensely influential little book entitled I and Thou. Buber’s main point is that there are two ways of relating to other people in our lives: We can see them as objects to be used – what Buber calls an “I-it” relationship; or we can see others as having feelings, dreams and needs as real and as important as our own that can be the basis for dialogue and relationship – an “I-Thou” relationship.

In his memoirs, Buber tells the story of how he came to his theory of I-Thou and I-It. When he was a professor of philosophy at a university in Germany, a young student came to see him. The student had received his draft notice to serve in the German army in World War I. He was a pacifist by nature and afraid of being killed in battle, but, at the same time, he was a loyal and fiercely patriotic German. He asked Buber what he should do: serve his country and risk being killed or claim conscientious objector status and perhaps leave another young man to be killed in his place. Continue reading