Life’s Agonies And Love’s Triumphs

Life’s Agonies And Love’s Triumphs

ProLifeCorner-   9-25-2017 – We’re sure most of our readers are familiar with the wonderful articles submitted by Mark Pickup.  We’re showing you a special article today with a speech delivered by his wife, LaRee at a prayer breakfast in Baltimore, MD some time ago.  If anyone has had a loved one who has or is still suffering, this will give you strength and courage to continue fighting the battle with that loved one.

The opening paragraph is by Mark and is on his home page most of the time.  We feel it shows the need for all Christians to work and pray together to bring our world back to Jesus.

Following his article is the speech given by LaRee, with comments by Mark.

LaRee and Mark are, indeed, a wonderful example of faith, hope, and love.  May God bless them abundantly for all they do to serve Him. Continue reading

Inspiring Joy in Others by Christ

Inspiring Joy in Others by Christ

“Whoever finds his life will lose it, and whoever loses his life for My sake will find it.”    

For more than fifty of his more than eighty years, Nurney Mason was a barber in the United States House of Representatives. Nurney Ma­son cut hair out of a tiny booth in the basement of the Rayburn Office Building — his little stall saw nearly as much history as the floor of the Capitol itself. And every day, he brought to his job not only his barbering skills, but kindness, optimism and encouragement He would greet everyone — whether powerful Congressman or lowest-level staffer — with a solid handshake and a knowing smile. Mason stayed upbeat, day after day, the vibrations of his clippers surely jarring his wrists over the half century he worked.

He was asked by one of his Congressional customers how he stayed so upbeat and happy all the time.

Nurney Mason replied simply, “I just make (joy) right here. I create joy where I stand.Continue reading

Spiritual Blindness

Spiritual Blindness

“They answered him, You were born in utter sin, and you would teach us? And they cast him out!”

The late neurologist and author Oliver Sacks wrote about a man born blind whose sight was restored. This miracle occurred nei­ther through prayer, nor through a concoction of dirt and divine saliva, but through a surgical correction of the patient’s eyes.

The blind man agreed eagerly to the surgery, experimental and delicate though it was. The operation went well, although the man’s eyes had to be bandaged for a time to let them heal, but at last the day came when the bandages could be removed. The surgical team, the man’s family, and others assembled as the nurses carefully unwound the dressings from the patient’s face. All were hushed, expectant.

For the first time in his life, the man opened his eyes and …

What were they expecting? What would you expect?

Jubilation! Joy! “Ah, color! Light! My wife’s sweet face, just as I’d always imagined it!”

But instead, the man turned his head from side to side to side. His expression was baffled and frightened.

“What’s wrong?” his doctor asked at last, and at the sound of his voice, the man turned in his direction.

“Oh, my God!” he said, his voice trembling. “I thought I was all alone.” And the man began to weep.

The man had been blind since birth. His brain knew only sound and touch, smell and taste; it had never received visual stimulation. It had never developed the neural pathways needed for processing visual images and had never created categories by which he might understand the data now crashing against his retinas on waves of light. Technically, his eyes worked — but he could not make sense of what he saw. Continue reading