The Resurrection of the Body vs Transexualism

The Resurrection of the Body vs Transexualism

“That the dead will rise, even Moses made (that) known in the passage about the bush, …”

Since he was a boy, the painter Henri Matisse would visit the great Pierre-Auguste Renoir every week, taking in everything he could from the great master. When Renoir contracted arthritis, Matisse began to come every day to bring food, brushes and paint, and anything else Renoir needed

One day, Matisse watched as Renoir groaned in pain while making a simple but exact brush stroke. Finally, the young would-be artist could no longer stand watching his mentor suffer.

“Master,” Matisse asked, “your work is already vast and important. Why keep torturing yourself like this?”

“Very simple,” Renoir answered. “The pain passes; but the beauty remains.” Continue reading

The Harvest Is Rich, But The Laborers Are Few.

The harvest is rich, but the laborers are few.

The world famous golfer Tiger Woods was once given a piece of advice by his father: “My dad once told me: no matter what anyone says or writes, really, none of those people has to hit your four-foot putt. You have to do it yourself.”

Perhaps what Mr. Woods senior meant is that there are some things we can only do ourselves regardless of other people. In a slightly different vein is the old saying, “If you want something done right, you have to do it yourself.” It can be said by exasperated parents who have sent their child to the shop to buy something and the child comes back with something quite different: or perhaps by boss whose staff doesn’t come up to snuff. Self-reliance and a willingness to do things for ourselves may be admirable traits. Indeed, there are some things that we just have to do for ourselves. Continue reading

The Light of Glory

The Light of Glory

 “While Jesus was praying, his face changed in appearance and his clothing became dazzling white.”

A woman who had never seen the ocean before went on a cruise.  On the voyage she was captivated by the variety of colors she saw in different parts of the ocean — azure, turquoise, aquamarine, emerald.   She collected samples of each hue in small bottles.

When she returned home, she wanted to show her friends the magnificent colors she had seen.   But when she poured the contents of each bottle into separate glasses to show them, she was shocked to see that all they contained was water — colorless, translucent, ordinary water. Continue reading

“Zeal for your house will consume me.”

Many years ago, a little village in Madagascar, off the west coast of Africa, wanted to build a small church. The village was little more than a slum; the nearest church was the cathedral, some several miles  away.

An elderly woman of the village, Madame Denise, the proprietor of a small restaurant, was revered by the town for her kindness and generosity. After talking with the priests of the cathedral (who served 30 parishes in a 200-mile area), she secured a promise that, if the villagers could build the structure, they would see that a priest was available to celebrate Mass every Friday evening. Continue reading